Testicular Cancer

TESTICULAR CANCER TREATMENTS1

Stage I Testicular Cancer1
Treatment of stage I testicular cancer depends on whether the cancer is a seminoma or a nonseminoma.

Treatment of seminoma may include the following:

* Surgery to remove the testicle, with or without radiation therapy to lymph nodes in the abdomen after the surgery, with lifelong follow-up.
* Surgery to remove the testicle, followed by chemotherapy and lifelong follow-up.

Treatment of nonseminoma may include the following 2:

* Surgery to remove the testicle and lymph nodes in the abdomen, with lifelong follow-up.
* Surgery to remove the testicle, with lifelong follow-up.
* Surgery followed by chemotherapy for patients at high risk of recurrence, with lifelong follow-up.

Stage II Testicular Cancer1

Treatment of stage II testicular cancer depends on whether the cancer is a seminoma or a nonseminoma.

Treatment of seminoma may include the following:

* When the tumor is 5 centimeters or smaller, treatment is usually surgery to remove the testicle followed by radiation therapy to lymph nodes in the abdomen and pelvis, with lifelong follow-up.
* When the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters, treatment is usually surgery to remove the testicle followed by combination chemotherapy or radiation therapy to lymph nodes in the abdomen and pelvis, with lifelong follow-up.

Treatment of nonseminoma may include the following:

* Surgery to remove the testicle and lymph nodes, with lifelong follow-up.
* Surgery to remove the testicle and lymph nodes, followed by combination chemotherapy and lifelong follow-up.
* Surgery to remove the testicle followed by combination chemotherapy and a second surgery if cancer remains, with lifelong follow-up.
* Combination chemotherapy before surgery to remove the testicle, for cancer that has spread and is thought to be life-threatening.
* A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy instead of removing the lymph nodes.

Stage III Testicular Cancer1

Treatment of stage III testicular cancer depends on whether the cancer is a seminoma or a nonseminoma.

Treatment of seminoma may include the following:

* Surgery to remove the testicle followed by combination chemotherapy. Any tumor remaining after treatment will need lifelong follow-up.
* A clinical trial of a new therapy.
* A clinical trial of high-dose chemotherapy with bone marrow transplant.

Treatment of nonseminoma may include the following:

* Surgery to remove the testicle, followed by combination chemotherapy.
* Combination chemotherapy followed by surgery to remove any remaining tumor. Additional chemotherapy may be given if the tumor tissue removed contains cancer cells that are growing.
* Combination chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy to the brain for cancer that has spread to the brain.
* Combination chemotherapy before surgery to remove the testicle, for cancer that has spread and is thought to be life-threatening.
* A clinical trial of a new therapy.
* A clinical trial of high-dose chemotherapy with bone marrow transplant.

Recurrent Testicular Cancer2

Treatment depends on what the cancer cells look like under a microscope, where the cancer recurred (came back), and other factors. Treatment options include systemic chemotherapy, high-dose systemic chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, surgery, and clinical trials testing new chemotherapy drugs. Recurrent Testicular Cancer
Treatment depends on what the cancer cells look like under a microscope, where the cancer recurred (came back), and other factors. Treatment options include systemic chemotherapy, high-dose systemic chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, surgery, and clinical trials testing new chemotherapy drugs.2

References
1. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/testicular/Patient/page5
2. http://www.tc-cancer.com/treatment.html 

TESTICULAR CANCER RESOURCES
TC cancer.com

National Cancer Institute

Sloan-Kettering

Mayo Clinic

Sean Kimerling Testicular Cancer Foundation

Carpe Testes


TESTICULAR CANCER mASS KICKERS
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Nigel’s blog 

Planet cancer
 testicular cancer group for young adults 

top of my head

I’ve Still Got Both My Nuts

Cancer Blog- Testicular Cancer : blogs by testicular cancer patients

 

Featured Testicular Cancer mAss Kicker Interviews

Jonny Imerman: Chicago, IL

Chris Brewer: Austin, TX

Matt Ferstler: Austin, TX

Corey Litchman: San Diego, CA

Mike CrayCraft: Cincinnati, OH

 

Featured mAss Kicking Testicular Cancer Organizations

Testicular Cancer Foundation:  Team Single Jingles:  based in Austin, TX

 

Medical Disclaimer
This website is designed to provide additional information to patients and their loved ones when faced with intimidating diagnoses. A physician or medical professional should be consulted before making any health related decisions. We serve as a portal for information so that an informed and efficient decision can be concluded by all parties involved.  The creators of this site are not responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any form of damages whatsoever resulting from the use (or misuse) of information contained in or implied by the content of this website. The purpose of the mAss Kickers is to empower people with knowledge, not to specifically advise people how to address each unique situation.

  • Simba

    The type of treatment with BEP chemo has the same side eftfecs nausea, high whie blood cell count, vomiting, loss of appetite but this may not happen to everyone. Chemo has come a long way with the medications to prevent the side eftfecs but it has proven to eradicate cancer cells so alot of individuals must take the side eftfecs in order to eliminate the cancer cells. So hopefully this round will not be as bad for your Dad but it will offer him the chance to beat the cancer. Good luck.

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